Tuesday, March 31, 2009

Homeschool: Time well spent

©Millie McNabb

Sometimes I meet mothers who are overwhelmed with the thought of homeschooling. They make comments like, “You’re so brave,” “You’re so organized,” or “You’re so patient.” Perhaps I have become some of those things, but none of them are requisites for homeschooling. What is required is your decision to do it.

The question is, "Do you want to pass on your Christian values to your children?" This is “why” of my homeschooling. Since I knew the “why”, I figured out the “how.”

The truth is that your children will likely become like those they spend the most time with. I thank God that I was introduced to the concept of homeschooling, which provided me an opportunity to spend lots of time with my children. It was indeed time well spent.

Ecclesiastes 3:1 says, “There is an appointed time for everything. And there is a time for every event under heaven.” God appointed me a season of homeschooling and now a season of reaping those benefits.

What thoughts do you have about homeschooling?

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at www.ChristianValuesLegacy.com.

Monday, March 30, 2009

Birthday Remembrances

©Millie McNabb

Today is my birthday. We did most of the celebrating this past weekend, since that was more convenient for us. Thanks to my Facebook friends for their greetings. Thanks for the snail-mail cards and phone calls.

I was thinking about my birthdays growing up. My grandfather who lived across the road from us had a birthday on March 31. He always teased me that I was a day older than he was. My mother always had us take a bath the night before our birthday to wash off “that 9-year-old dirt,” or whichever year it was. One of my aunts that lived in another state always remembered to send a card, and had a source for fascinating cards that we all loved.

We usually had an intergenerational family gathering which included the four families that farmed together. Mama let us pick out the kind of cake we wanted. One year I requested banana cake. My youngest brother added to the d├ęcor by sticking a real banana in the middle of it.

God gave instructions for celebrations—the Feasts described in Exodus. As we celebrate our birthdays, we can use this as an example to teach our children about the importance of pausing, recognizing milestones and thanking God for His many blessings. It’s an important part of passing on our Christian values.

How do you make birthday celebrations special?

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at www.ChristianValuesLegacy.com.

Friday, March 27, 2009

Birthday Surprise

My two youngest daughters orchestrated a birthday surprise for me tonight. While my husband (he's a thoughtful guy who likes to make special days special) took me to dinner and a movie, they cleaned house and did my laundry for me. They also had a bouquet of sunflowers on the coffee table.

One of my goals in life has been to enjoy my children at every age. They are easy to enjoy and are my good friends as adults.

Psalm 127:3 "Behold, children are a gift of the LORD, The fruit of the womb is a reward."

I love you, Ladies.

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at http://www.christianvalueslegacy.com./

Thursday, March 26, 2009

Christian Values in Economics: Stewardship & Household Chores

©Millie McNabb

I was talking with some moms about household chores, allowances and teaching children about economy. When our children were young, we kept household chores separate from allowances. We paid a small allowance, created other opportunities for them to earn money, and encouraged entrepreneurship.

One of the key Christian values to teach our children is that everything belongs to God and we are stewards of all that He has given us. “And the Lord said, ‘Who then is the faithful and sensible steward, whom his master will put in charge of his servants, to give them their rations at the proper time?’” (Luke 12:42)

What’s the first thing your child has stewardship over? Himself. I used 3x5 cards and drew pictures on them for each thing the child need to complete to get himself ready for the day (or for bed.) They included such things as brushing teeth, combing hair, using the bathroom, getting dressed. As they got older (by age 2) they also participated in maintaining the family household.

Household chores give a mini-picture of God’s economy. Everything in the child’s world belongs to the parents, and the parents are providing things for the child’s use. We intentionally taught the girls to be good stewards of what they had been given. I remember them coming home absolutely shocked that other kids at youth group were writing on their clothes with markers.

As stewards, we maintain the work according to God’s standard, not our own. Part of intentional parenting is to work with your children as you teach them. Doing meaningful work together grows deep relationships. When your child understands the task, purposefully hand it over to the child to do themselves, inspect the work when it’s done, and compliment the child. If appropriate, have an older child teach a younger one.

My Thursday blogs for the next few weeks will be focused on teaching your children Christian Values in economy. I’d love to have you share your stories about teaching your child stewardship.

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at www.ChristianValuesLegacy.com.

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Choose a Spouse: Belief Plus

©Millie McNabb

I got four packages of socks of the same brand from the same rack, and yet when I was matching them up after they were washed, the lengths were different by as much as two inches. It did not occur to me to compare lengths before I purchased them. Toe to heel seemed pretty consistent, so I don’t think I mistakenly got different sizes. Yet the fact remains—they’re unequally matched.

I have met some Christians who seem genuinely surprised that they are “unequally yoked” when they married a professing Christian. Just as I could have been a little more diligent in my shopping, Christian values require us to be diligent in choosing our spouse. Remember, God considers this to be a lifelong choice, so over the next few weeks, we’ll look at what Scripture says to help us choose well for a strong Christian marriage.

Belief Plus—1. You’re both Christians, but are you both ready to leave your parents? God sets this tone for marriage in Genesis 2:24. “For this reason a man shall leave his father and his mother, and be joined to his wife; and they shall become one flesh.”

The classic caricature of the “Mama’s Boy” or the wife who is always “going home to mother” depicts spouses who haven’t yet emotionally left their parents. In the courtship stages, it can be hard to spot because they probably treat their parents well, so you assume they’ll treat you the same way.

The truth is more likely that there is a combination of fear of leaving the parent and anger that they’re not able to go out and be independent. When you marry, you may discover that you’re receiving all the pent-up anger; your spouse will defend the parent, but not you, and; you will be expected to take care of them more like a parent than a spouse.

What characteristics did you look for in a spouse? Follow my blog next Wednesday for more thoughts on teaching our children how to Choose a Spouse.

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at http://www.christianvalueslegacy.com./

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Follow That Blog

©Millie McNabb

Thank you for visiting and reading my blog. I’ve heard back from parents, grandparents and teachers that they are appreciating the examples of sharing Godly perspectives through everyday living that they find on this blog.

I invite you to not only read the blog, but to become an official follower of the blog. It's easy and convenient to become a blog follower. On the right sidebar, select "Follow." You'll get notices of new posts on your dashboard, and be able to comment and discuss entries.

I am also interested to know what kinds of things you enjoy and what things you’d like to see on the blog. If there’s a topic that’s on your mind or that you hear others wondering about, please let me know.

We are excited about our current Wednesday series on "match making." I hope you’ll consider coming along to this wonderful series, and our new Thursday series "your children and Christian perspectives on the economy," starting this week.

Would you do me a favor? Take a moment to share your thoughts and feedback here. That would be truly helpful. Of course, the very best feedback would be to have you as a follower.

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at www.ChristianValuesLegacy.com.

Monday, March 23, 2009

Snow Day Footsteps

©Millie McNabb

We woke up to snow again today after enjoying a few days of warmer weather. I noticed as I drove into town that the weather pattern was varied. There was a mile of slush and rough ruts, followed by a stretch that was only wet, then another piece of road that slushy snow.

Later on, I was walking into the house with my grand-daughters. Although the walk had been shoveled, they preferred to walk in the snow along the side. Their little footprints revealed the path they had taken.

The path we follow as adults has its roots in what we were taught as children. As we teach our children, imparting God’s Word is foundational, though not a guarantee, to them following a Godly path. “Establish my footsteps in Your word, And do not let any iniquity have dominion over me.” Psalm 119:133.

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at www.ChristianValuesLegacy.com.

Saturday, March 21, 2009

Health Fair

©Millie McNabb

My daughter participated in a health fair and I helped at her booth. It is always interesting to talk with the people that stop by, and fascinating to watch the people whether they stop or not.

Ours was one of the few holistic booths in a convention hall of traditional medicine. Some people studiously ignored us. They would glance at our display, ignore our greeting, and walk on. If they did stop, their comment was often, “I don’t need that. I’m good.”

There were people who didn’t know that we—or any other display—existed. Usually they were in a group and were walking around the fair talking with each other and not paying attention to the displays. One group of three women reminded me of flight attendants. They walked purposely past all other displays to their destination--a weight loss booth.

There were three groups of preschoolers-on-a-string. I imagine their favorites were the pig lung, the therapy dogs, and the booths with candy and balloons. Cookies were available at the host table, which I thought was incongruous for a health fair.

My favorite people, and the reason we participate in health fairs, are the couples or friend groups who see something on our display, and say to each other, “Maybe they can help you.” We probably can help them.

In Luke 8:1-15 Jesus told a story about the sower who had varying success depending on where the seed fell. The sower was faithful to sow the seed; the results depended on the soil where it fell.

Whether it’s health news, God’s Word, or homeschool lessons we’re sowing, we need to be faithful to scatter the seed. Even the good soil would produce nothing without seed. Do you have any stories of faithful sowing that took root over time?

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at www.ChristianValuesLegacy.com.

Thursday, March 19, 2009

New Digs

©Millie McNabb

There’s a freshly dug hole under our pump house. This marks the beginning of the next episode of “Skunk Wars.” We’ve lived here for 18 years, and have had skunks wander through, but last year they dug in and set up housekeeping under the building. We thought they were gone, and filled around the building last fall.

Sin can be like skunks. We think it’s gone, and then find it’s moved in again. It’s important to keep our confessions up-to-date, and to teach our children be vigilant in keeping ungodly thoughts from moving into their hearts. We can join the Psalmist in His prayer: “Search me, O God, and know my heart; Try me, and know my anxieties; And see if [there is any] wicked way in me, And lead me in the way everlasting.” (Psalm 139:23-24.)

How did you teach your children about confession?

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at www.ChristianValuesLegacy.com.

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Choose a Spouse: Checking the Dye Lot

©Millie McNabb

I remember starting a large project when I had just learned to crochet. As I was selecting yarn, the sales associate told me to check the dye lot, and get all the yarn for the entire project at one time. I didn’t think about that advice when I purchased a dozen pair of black socks. When I sorted them on laundry day, the sock colors ranged were slightly different—black, light black, and brown-black.

A Christian may marry another believer thinking you’re in agreement, only to discover that your understanding of “Christian” varies greatly. One of my friends married a man who told her he was a Christian simply because he knew she wouldn’t marry a non-Christian. So how can you discover the “true colors” of a potential partner?

In a discussion about false prophets, Jesus, said, "So then, you will know them by their fruits.” (Matthew 7:20) Look for the evidence of a changed life. Are his words and actions Christlike? Is he intentionally growing in his faith?

Look for evidence beyond your experience. Ask his friends and family about his professed belief and what effect they have seen in his life. If he objects to your talking to others, that can be a red flag, too.

Look for his interaction with others. Does he have a healthy relationship with other men? How does he interact with women? Is he comfortable around children? How does he treat his mother?

If the dye lot is different--the walk doesn't support the talk--don't buy into that partnership.

Watch for “Belief Plus” on my blog next week for more thoughts on choosing your mate.

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at http://www.christianvalueslegacy.com./

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

Wearing of the Green

©Millie McNabb

When I was in elementary school, the kids were serious about pinching anyone who didn’t wear green on St. Patrick’s Day. The first grade teacher always had a bunch of green construction paper shamrocks prepared to pin on any student who forgot to wear something green. She was kind in a practical way.

We model kindness for our children. We teach them to be aware of others who may be getting “pinched” by others, and help them out. We can’t leave it to luck; we have to be intentional. “Be kind to one another, tender-hearted, forgiving each other, just as God in Christ also has forgiven you.” (Ephesians 4:32)

What kind acts do you remember?

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at www.ChristianValuesLegacy.com.

Monday, March 16, 2009

The Deli

©Millie McNabb

There’s a sandwich shop where my husband and I eat lunch probably twice a week. I parked my car and walked up to the counter, where the owner and helper were grinning. They had the order all ready and just asked, “To stay or to go?”

Our sandwich order is very predictable, and easy to know. Our children are not as predictable, but well worth getting to know. As parents we work at developing Godly character and pray for discernment to understand what our children are thinking and intending. For God, our hearts and thoughts are readily available. His only question is “To stay or to go?” “Will you stay with Me or go your own way?”

King David encouraged his son to stay with God. "As for you, my son Solomon, know the God of your father, and serve Him with a whole heart and a willing mind; for the LORD searches all hearts, and understands every intent of the thoughts. If you seek Him, He will let you find Him; but if you forsake Him, He will reject you forever.” (I Chronicles 28:9)

How are you encouraging your children to serve God with a whole heart and willing mind?

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at www.ChristianValuesLegacy.com.

Saturday, March 14, 2009

Mark it with a “B”

©Millie McNabb

Our grand-daughters came to visit today. We have some stools given to our daughters by their grandparents. The stools have a letter on the bottom to identify who the owner is. The three-year-old recognized that one of the letters was the same as her initial, and made sure she sat on that stool. Someday, she may ask who the letter “B” stool belongs to.

I smiled as I thought about marking the stools when we first got them. One of our daughters was going through a phase where she wanted to be called “Becky.” The phase was short-lived, but at her insistence, the stool was marked with a “B.”

Names and their meanings seem to be important in the Bible. God even stepped in and changed people’s names. In Genesis 17:5 He changed “high father” to “father of multitudes.” "No longer shall your name be called Abram, But your name shall be Abraham; For I have made you the father of a multitude of nations.” In Genesis 32:28 He changed “Supplanter, held by the heel” with “God wrestler.” “He said, ‘Your name shall no longer be Jacob, but Israel; for you have striven with God and with men and have prevailed’."

How did you choose your children’s names?

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at http://www.christianvalueslegacy.com./

Friday, March 13, 2009

Honey Butter

©Millie McNabb

I was making honey butter tonight to go with our cornbread and chili. I was appreciating a simple invention that had been added to the honey bottle that kept the honey from dripping.

The Bible records some inventions and credits God with helping people who are using their skills. One I was surprised to read is in II Chronicles 26:15. “In Jerusalem he made engines {of war} invented by skillful men to be on the towers and on the corners for the purpose of shooting arrows and great stones. Hence his fame spread afar, for he was marvelously helped until he {was} strong.”

As parents, teachers, homeschoolers, and friends, we need to encourage our children to develop their God-given skills. Too often, we focus on overcoming weaknesses and overlook the strengths waiting to be developed. Other times we forget our children are not us and we inadvertently try to remake them in our own image.

Each child is different. When we recognize that and encourage them in honoring God with the time and gifts He has given them, they are more likely to retain their Christian values and become Christian adults.

What are you doing to develop your child’s strengths?

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at www.ChristianValuesLegacy.com.

Thursday, March 12, 2009

Who Can Help?

©Millie McNabb

We attended a memorial service today for a person we’d known for some years. When we first met her she was young and perky. Through the years we saw alcohol take its toll. The pastor talked about the combination of “relief and grief” that may surround a death.

The pastor said that the deceased had once said, “If I can’t help myself, maybe I can help others.” There were those attending the funeral that she had helped.

Our ultimate source of help is God. “O LORD my God, I cried to You for help, and You healed me.” (Psalm 30:2)

When has God sent you help from an unexpected source?

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at www.ChristianValuesLegacy.com.

Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Choose a Spouse: Matching Socks

©Millie McNabb

When my husband needs new black socks, we get rid of all the old ones, and buy a dozen matching socks so that we don’t spend needless time pairing them up after laundry day. The concept is sound, but this last batch we got, was not as well-matched as we imagined.

We got four packages of the same brand from the same rack. They seemed to be alike, but laundry day told a different story. When I put them side by side, some definitely had a brown cast to them. (I hadn’t thought to check the dye lot numbers.) Then there is the length. Who was in charge of quality control anyway? They vary by almost two inches. (How would you check for that at the store?)

Matchmaking in marriages can be like that, too. We start with the sound concept in II Corinthians 6:14. “Do not be unequally yoked together with unbelievers. For what fellowship has righteousness with lawlessness? And what communion has light with darkness?” Then things start to come out in the laundry.

Watch for “Checking the Dye Lot” on my blog next week for more thoughts on that.

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at http://www.christianvalueslegacy.com./

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Daylight Savings

©Millie McNabb

I forgot about the time change to daylight savings this week. I was lounging around Sunday morning, when my husband said that we had half an hour to get to church. We moved into high gear and got there just after the first song.

There are minor consequences of forgetting daylight savings time. There is a greater consequence—an eternal consequence--to missing out on the saving grace of Jesus Christ. As we approach Easter, make sure your children get the real story.

“But on the first day of the week, at early dawn, they came to the tomb bringing the spices which they had prepared. And they found the stone rolled away from the tomb, but when they entered, they did not find the body of the Lord Jesus.” Luke 24:1-3

What’s your salvation experience?

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at www.ChristianValuesLegacy.com.

Monday, March 9, 2009

Electronic Sword Drill

©Millie McNabb

I was looking up something on BibleGateway.com and came across a note saying that the peak hours of use for the mobile version was during church. I hadn’t thought about people reading along with the pastor using an electronic device. Then I wondered how that might change “Sword Drill” games, where you race to see who can look up Scripture verses fastest.

[Ephesians 6:17 includes the word of God as the sword in the list of the armor of God: “…and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God.” Hebrews 4:12 further describes this sword: “For the word of God is living and active and sharper than any two-edged sword, and piercing as far as the division of soul and spirit, of both joints and marrow, and able to judge the thoughts and intentions of the heart.”]

What do you gain or lose with an electronic version of the Bible?

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at www.ChristianValuesLegacy.com.

Saturday, March 7, 2009

Choose Life

©Millie McNabb

I saw an ad on TV with different celebrities promoting “saving children” somewhere. The thought crossed my mind that these same people would probably support the right of a woman to choose, over the right of an unborn child to live.

When we lived in Maryland, I was in the pediatrician’s waiting room. The news channel was reporting a mother-drowns-preschoolers kind of story. The receptionist and the woman at the counter exchanged “Isn’t it awful” comments. The next news story was people with signs protesting and marching around an abortion clinic. Again there was an exchange at the counter, but this time it was disgust at the protesters. “Why don’t they leave them alone? Don’t they know women have a right to choose?”

I intentionally talked to the receptionist about the conversations I had overheard, and the apparent discontinuity in her thinking. I asked her the question, “At what point does a child’s life become important enough that you think the mother should no longer choose?” I think a bumper sticker I saw reflects when: Pro-choice before conception; Pro-life after.

We make choices all the time. God wants us to make choices that honor Him and give us life. "So choose life in order that you may live, you and your descendants, by loving the LORD your God, by obeying His voice, and by holding fast to Him; for this is your life and the length of your days….” (Deuteronomy 30:19b-20a)

We make poor choices as well as good ones. The Good News is that God offers forgiveness through His Son, Jesus Christ. We need to know and we need to teach our children, that whatever poor choices we’ve made, we can always humbly come back to God. He’ll be happy we chose life--again.

How have you taught your children about God’s love and forgiveness?

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at http://www.christianvalueslegacy.com./

Friday, March 6, 2009

Pure Milk

©Millie McNabb

I was at my daughter’s clinic and she was with a client when her two-week old daughter woke up, and started to cry. I offered my thumb, which I knew to be a great comfort from my early days, but that was a poor substitute for what she really wanted.

That is how our desire for the Lord is to be. We cry out to the Lord. We are not satisfied with less. “…like newborn babies, long for the pure milk of the Word, so that by it you may grow in respect to salvation…” (I Peter 2:2)

As we teach our children, we need to be careful that we are not offering them poor substitutions when the thing that will satisfy them is God and His Word. We model this desire in our own lives as we teach, parent and coach our children.

In what ways do you model the desire for the pure milk of the Word to your children?

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at http://www.christianvalueslegacy.com./

Thursday, March 5, 2009

Haircuts and Such

©Millie McNabb

One of my daughters is also a temperament coach. She delights in identifying people with choleric traits by their hair style. The choleric is the take-charge person, and their hair is under control, and often at attention. (Think drill sergeant hair.)

Paul (Saul) is one of the more notable people in the Bible with choleric traits. He was going full blast persecuting Christians. “Now Saul, still breathing threats and murder against the disciples of the Lord, went to the high priest… (Acts 9:1) When he was converted, he was still going full blast, but his focus changed to converting others to Christianity. “But Saul kept increasing in strength and confounding the Jews who lived at Damascus by proving that this {Jesus} is the Christ.” (Acts 9:22)

God uniquely designed Paul for the work which He had chosen for him. “But the Lord said to him, ‘Go, for he is a chosen instrument of Mine, to bear My name before the Gentiles and kings and the sons of Israel…’.” (Acts 9:15) God has uniquely designed each of us for His purposes.

How have you seen God’s design in your life?

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers temperament and parenting coaching. Order your individual temperament profile or a family package today at http://www.christianvalueslegacy.com./

Wednesday, March 4, 2009

History Perspectives

©Millie McNabb

We studied United States history in our homeschool by reading biographies of the presidents. It gave a broader perspective of the issues, philosophies and alliances that led to the adoption of different policies. The library was a great resource for those studies.

I also purchased a book with pictures and fill-in-the-blank short biographies of all the presidents that was designed to make copies. Each girl had a three-ring binder, and updated the information over the course of the study.

Each girl also had a notebook with timeline sheets in it. We added information over a number of years about people and events as we learned about them. One section included a personal timeline for each child.

Records and history are important. God specifically instructed Ezekial to record the fall of Jerusalem. "Son of man, write the name of the day, this very day. The king of Babylon has laid siege to Jerusalem this very day.” (Ezekial 24:2) Eisenhower had many pictures taken of the Holocaust, so that it could not be denied in future years.
“Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it.” (George Santayana)

What lessons from history have you applied in your life?

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at www.ChristianValuesLegacy.com.

Tuesday, March 3, 2009

Is Grace Here?

©Millie McNabb

We were at a women’s meeting when we learned that the facility had double-booked our room. One of my friends commented that we needed ‘grace.’ I replied that I didn’t think she was coming.

Grace is when we receive something good we don’t deserve, or when we extend to others a kindness they don’t deserve. (Mercy is when we don’t receive something bad that we do deserve.) II Peter 3:18a admonishes us to “…grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.” Graciousness is one of the traits we teach our children.

We grow in grace. We start out crying and pouting anytime we don’t get our way. We learn to manage our anger. Like a fuse in an electrical current, we may be able to handle 5amps before we blow. We work our way through 15 and 20 amps, maybe 30 which are the normal household uses. As we move into church leadership, we need 60amps; community leadership, 200 amps or greater.

A church I attended in the past was having a ministry fair Sunday morning after the worship service. Presumably every ministry was to have a table. I was also on the worship team, and knew my time would be tight, so I went Saturday night, identified my table on their "map" and put out a tablecloth and decorations, but not my materials. The next morning when I arrived, everyone else was set up, and had completely taken over my space. I knew I would cry if I stayed there, so I went into a different room. One of the guys had seen me come in and realized what had happened. He made half a table available, came and got me, and helped me set up. Ironically, my ministry was "Growing in Maturity."

One thing that seems never to be in short supply is opportunities to grow in graciousness. It is those opportunities that help me accomplish my life goal to become a gracious, mature, productive Christian woman.

How’s your “grace fuse”?

God bless….

Millie McNabb--becoming a gracious, mature, productive Christian woman--founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at www.ChristianValuesLegacy.com.

Monday, March 2, 2009

Spares Living

©Millie McNabb

When my husband and I started married life together, we decided to run our household on the “spares” concept. That is, we would have a spare container of the goods we used regularly. When we started to use the spare, we’d restock it, rather than running out of anything and having to make a panic run to the store.

This was my husband’s idea. By temperament, he is much more of a planner and strategist than I am. I am much more willing to go without or have an unplanned adventure to the store. However, the “spares living” has served us well over the years.

Jesus taught this concept in the Matthew 25 about the virgins and the lamp oil. “…but the prudent took oil in flasks along with their lamps.” (Matthew 25:4) The women who failed to bring extra oil missed out on the party. We don’t know what lies ahead, but insofar as we are able, we need to prepare.

There are several practical “preparedness” lessons we teach our children, that we can use to illustrate this biblical principle:
- Go to the bathroom before going on a trip.
- Get a drink of water before going to bed.
- Chores and homework before partying.

What practical applications can you tie to that verse?

God bless….

Millie McNabb, founder of Christian Values Legacy, offers parenting seminars that focus on passing on your Christian values. Request your free report “Considerations for Intentionally Raising Children to Become Christian Adults” today at www.ChristianValuesLegacy.com.